Does Ice Bullets Actually Work?

Potatoes last one shot, so build reusable! Discuss ammo designs and ideas. Tough to find cannon part or questions? Ask here!
LouisBMason
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Fri Oct 29, 2021 1:38 am

Anyone here know about Ice bullets? Does Ice Bullets Actually Work?
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Moonbogg
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Fri Oct 29, 2021 6:00 pm

I'll give it a google to find out. I think you'd have to try it out yourself. Also, if you were going to use them you'd have to carry around a freezer with you, right? Remove bullet from freezer, quickly load and FIRE! I think it would just shatter into dust and water vapor if shot from a real gun, but I'm sure ice slugs would work from a potato cannon.
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Mon Nov 01, 2021 10:47 pm

way back when people were using pykrete. Sawdust and water frozen. The sawdust makes the ice melt a lot slower.
spud_wiki/index.php?title=Pycrete
It should be mentioned int eh forum someplace as well.
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reginasilke
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Fri Nov 05, 2021 6:11 am

I tip my hat to the Mythbusters, but I have to say I believe it is entirely possible.

The Mythbuster ice bullet was brittle because they did not deaerate the water. A very cold, deaerated bullet would be hard, and not melt when fired.

Speaking as a formulation chemist,

Any problems with the ice bullet being brittle could be solved by doing a little chemical research using polymers to modify the rheology of the ice. This is a very common practice to modify fluid behavior.

I think a problem with using such bullets could be the impracticality of carrying around extremely cold bullets. This would require a generator and freezer. I bet you might have a design problem with getting gun powder to ignite at low temperatures, but I am confident that could be solved as well.
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jackssmirkingrevenge
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Thu Nov 25, 2021 9:33 am

Moonbogg wrote:
Fri Oct 29, 2021 6:00 pm
I think you'd have to try it out yourself.
Maybe not, given this appears to be a bot account promoting whatever is in the signature.
hectmarr wrote:You have to make many weapons, because this field is long and short life
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Thu Nov 25, 2021 2:25 pm

reginasilke wrote:
Fri Nov 05, 2021 6:11 am
I tip my hat to the Mythbusters, but I have to say I believe it is entirely possible.

The Mythbuster ice bullet was brittle because they did not deaerate the water. A very cold, deaerated bullet would be hard, and not melt when fired.

Speaking as a formulation chemist,

Any problems with the ice bullet being brittle could be solved by doing a little chemical research using polymers to modify the rheology of the ice. This is a very common practice to modify fluid behavior.

I think a problem with using such bullets could be the impracticality of carrying around extremely cold bullets. This would require a generator and freezer. I bet you might have a design problem with getting gun powder to ignite at low temperatures, but I am confident that could be solved as well.
Or you just do what others have done for years: use sawdust. Not only modifies the ice but makes it melt much slower. Hence the British military considered building aircraft carriers with sawdust-ice for WW2. https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Project_Habakkuk
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